I S S U E 0 0 5


 

A Parisian Instant:
An exposition of Nicholle Kobi’s Art


Grosse: Decolonizing the body’s occupancy

MOVIE RADAR: March


By Myriam Dimanche

Artwork - Girl Boss by Nicholle Kobi, drawing of a black woman with an afro sitting on her office desk in a swanky New York apartment

Girl Boss by Nicholle Kobi

Having had very little exposure to French visual artist Nicholle Kobi’s artwork, I was eager to learn more once I heard that she would be hosting a pop-up gallery in Montreal, on Saturday, February 24th.

Once inside, I was greeted by beautiful paintings and drawings, all of which centered on the majestic black woman in all her forms – from confident and resplendent in a ball gown for a night out, to cozying up next to her boo, relaxing together while sipping a martini.

A comment the patrons of this event repeatedly made during the Q&A session, moderated by Mlle Geri, was the satisfaction and pride evoked by the art because the women could finally see themselves. They were represented. They were mirrored. And at last, they were seen for who they really were: multi-faceted and complex, but continually strong and beautiful.

The pieces were at once classic, holding a timeless quality that transcended the restraints of being contemporary – and modern, in capturing black women using technology and placing them in settings reflecting those you’d find yourself in today: on your bed with a laptop in hand, sipping your coffee and working that online hustle.

Below are some of the prints that were displayed, and others which are available in her online shop: www.nichollekobi.com.


  • artowrk - Happy Woman by Nicholle Kobi - Limited Edition
    Happy Woman by Nicholle Kobi - Limited Edition


By Myriam Laabidi

Out of breath. This is how we’re left after reading «Grosse», the recently published French novel written by Lynda Dion. Eight drawings, fashioned in charcoal by the author without much artistic value, make up the eight chapters of her book. They have a meaning, a coherence, and a chronology.

Photo credit: Empeiria Photography

And then, the author pulls us into the depths, drowning us in a ravenous and crazy-paced read, void of punctuation, or pools of air to breathe.

She is overweight and it kills her. She didn’t make herself that way. She was born that way. She mistreats her body, abuses it – is blinded by the fact that it is colonized. Colonized by beauty diktats – the same that makes one detest their hair, their skin color, their nose, their acne, the grain of their skin, and so forth.

The decolonization of her body is a process of revolt, an outbreak that manifests violently. Lynda slices, cuts and eviscerates herself. She becomes a butcher. Everything is done in excess as a way to dismiss her body from her mind, with her alcohol addiction, sex or food binging. We wish to help but are pissed at her defeatism. We thus try to understand, and sincerely hope she comes out of it.

Lynda Dion is not a woman of color. She is an overweight woman who has suffered from a physical disparity, but her pain is universal. The minute we go through an episode of exclusion because of physical attributes and do not feel represented, we see ourselves in her life story. Any woman who’s at war with herself and her body will find words to relate to in Grosse.

This book is a vibrant testimony that is not always easy to hear, but nonetheless necessary. For ultimately, it is salvaging and helps in reconciliation with oneself. A must read.

_

Myriam is a model, a mother of two beautiful daughters and also a writer. Catch her pieces on Me, Myself and Montreal.


By Myriam Dimanche

Weren’t we right about Black Panther or what? The movie was incredible and did NOT disappoint. If you still haven’t seen it – what are you waiting for?! And if you’re wondering whether to see it in a regular theater or in 3D – having seen it once in each format – it’s definitely worth opting for the more expensive, but unforgettable 3D experience.

Here is the list of movies we’re eager to see this month:

 

Click the poster image to view the trailer

Red Sparrow Gringo A Wrinkle in Time Ismael’s Ghost Final Portrait
Mar. 02 Mar. 09 Mar. 09 Mar. 23 Mar. 30
Watch the trailer Watch the trailer Watch the trailer Watch the trailer Watch the trailer

Click the button below to access the previous issue


 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Myriam Richard

VP & COO
Myriam Dimanche

COLLABORATOR (Literature)
Myriam Laabidi

COLLABORATING PHOTOGRAPHER
Christine Empeiria
Empeiria Photography

 

 


 

 

No Comments

Leave a Reply